April 20, 2011 at 9:44 pm | Blog | No comment

iPhone 4 with Satellites

If you are unaware of what’s been uncovered, see here for more information. Basically, since iOS 4.0, your iPhone has been recording where it has been, and storing it in an unencrypted file.

Now, my view on this? For me, I don’t mind where I go being tracked, since I could potentially find it useful at a later stage, though the fact that it was happening behind my back and with no way of turning it off concerns me. I’m also glad that this data isn’t being sent to any third party or Apple. Still doesn’t help that there’s no way of shutting this feature off, officially. There’s bound to be a jailbreak option to stop this happening appearing in the wild soon.

Using this app developed by the people who found out about the tracking, I’ve been able to see what my phone has been tracking. Looking at it, the points being made are fairly accurate, though there are a few anomalies like me being placed in Portsmouth, Swansea, East London and Worcester.

iPhone Tracking - OverallFrom looking at the data recorded, it starts when I buy my iPhone 4 from the 3Store in Gloucester. One thing I notice at the start is that for some reason it doesn’t track when I’m at home at all, until very recently. I also notice I get a lot of clusters at one specific point, even when I’m there for a short period of time, such as Bath. I’ve not been to Bath apart from passing on the train, but it seems to show the impression I was there for a lot of the time.

Now the app is designed not to reveal my exact location every second (see the app page), and I’ve not yet looked at the raw data to see what’s actually recorded yet. It’s something I will l0ok into though.

This won’t stop me using my iPhone, but it’s not a nice thought when you’re being tracked and you have no way of turning that feature off. At least phone carriers can’t release the data unless given a court order. All you need is someone to get hold of your iPhone or computer illegitimately and where you’ve been is available to a cybercriminal’s fingertips.

April 20, 2011 at 9:44 pm | Blog | No comment

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